There are job openings in the golf industry but Kristen Yoon was a step ahead of the game, recognising that Korean players need a voice.


It Helps To Speak The Language

There are job openings in the golf industry but Kristen Yoon was a step ahead of the game, recognising that Korean players need a voice.

As the next edition of Women & Golf is out NOW, here’s a sneak preview of what you can expect from Lewine Mair's interview in this issue.

More and more women are working in the golf industry - as coaches, playing professionals, club secretaries and, more recently, green-keepers. 

But how about this for something away from the norm?

Kristen Yoon, a fourth generation Korean who is now working for the Ladies Professional Golfers Association in Florida, has a job which she had in her mind’s eye long before it became a reality. 

Namely, one of working as a mediator between the LPGA and the proliferating number of Korean players, of whom there are currently three in the top five of the World Rankings.

To Kristen, it had always been hard to accept that these leading sportswomen were getting so little of the TV and newspaper coverage they deserved.

After studying marketing and media at the University of San Diego, this striking daughter of an American father and a Korean mother went to work at TaylorMade Golf Company. 

Without quite being her scene, it introduced this sports addict - “sport is in my DNA” - to the golfing world. 

At the same time, it prompted her next move, one of following- up on her education with a Masters in Sports Management.

The Masters complete and still no job offers to match her dreams, Kristen looked in vain for work in the realm of sports’ marketing. 

At the same time, she took note of how any job connected with golf seemed to sire the same question when it came to the interview stages. 

Did she speak Korean? The answer, here, is that she did not.

True, she was able to give a single-word greeting over the phone to her grandmother in Seoul but, in terms of being able to write the language, she was a non-starter. 

Maybe, if she had paid more attention to the classes which followed the weekly service at the Korean church her family attended in the States, things might have been different but, if the truth be told, she did not feel in any way connected to her Korean roots and gave up on those classes the moment her mother admitted defeat.

This is just a snippet of Kristen Yoon's interview in the latest issue of Women & Golf magazine. You can pick up Women & Golf, on sale NOW, or click here to subscribe now to read the full feature and enjoy W&G delivered to your door! 

 

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